Francisco Lindor: Dodgers won’t deal, Cleveland Indians won’t blink

If the Cleveland Indians don’t get what they want for Francisco Lindor, the front office will chalk up this offseason to a “fact finding mission.”

The Cleveland Indians and shortstop Francisco Lindor promise to be one of the most recurring trade rumors of the offseason.

And while the Dodgers appear unwilling to part with the upper crust of their farm system in a trade (OF Alex Verdugo, 2B Gavin Lux, RF Dustin May), don’t expect the Indians’ front office to blink.

As evidenced at last July’s trade deadline, the Indians will trade a key cog of their team, if their demand is met.

The New York Post’s Joel Sherman wrote the following, regarding how the Tribe’s front office is viewed by a rival executive.

“Rivals say the Indians’ tendency is to set a high-return bar and not budge without getting what they want, accepting the process as fact finding to use for another day if a trade cannot be enacted.”

If this is how the Indians are currently treating other teams in regards to Lindor, so be it. I’ve previously written that I’m for keeping Lindor, even if that means he walks as a free agent. Thanks to the emergence of Shane Bieber, Zach Plesac and Aaron Civale, the window to reach the postseason and win the Central has been propped back open.

This 70+ plus year drought of ending the season with a loss needs to end, and that’s more likely to  happen with Lindor on the roster.

It’s true, this offseason is the last chance for the Indians to maximize the return for their four-time All-Star. He’ll still be able to command quite a return before the trade deadline because he’ll still help a club out for two postseasons.

That said, teams are going to be hesitant to deal two huge prospect packages for a guy who could walk.

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Sherman dropped another nugget, writing Lindor may be “more amenable” to signing a long-term contract before he hits free agency, meaning his new team would have exclusive negotiation rights until his contract expires.

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